All posts filed under: writing

eBook: WMI Query Language via PowerShell

If you read the WQL series of posts on this blog, you may be aware by now that I was working on converting that series in to an eBook. So, finally, I made it. This ebook has 9 chapters (56 pages of WMI and PowerShell goodness) and here is the high-level content outline: Introduction Tools for the job WMI Data queries WMI Event Queries: Introduction Intrinsic Event Queries Extrinsic Event Queries Timer Events WMI Schema Queries WMI Event consumers As you see above, the content of this book much more than what was there in the blog posts. I have included a bonus chapter (WMI event consumers) to show how permanent event consumers can be create using both WMI and the PowerEvents module by @pcgeek86. I’ve spent almost 38hrs of editing on this book. This is excluding the hours my friends — Shay Levy, @Alexandair, Philip LaVoie, and Robert Robelo — spent reviewing the content. I am very thankful to them for spending their weekend reviewing this ebook and providing the feedback. Their feedback really …

Learn WMI Query Language using PowerShell

These posts in the form of an ebook now available Back in July, I started a series of articles on WMI query language. There has been lot of delay in finishing up the series and when I did finish it, there were several issues with my blog. I had to re-write last two parts of the series. So, lot of links you might have bookmarked may not be valid since the entire blog content went through a churn. So, I thought it will be good to publish one post with links to all articles in this series. So, here it is — all 10 parts of the series. 1. WMI query language – An introduction 2. WMI query language – Keywords and Operators 3. WMI query language – Data Queries: SELECT, FROM, and WHERE 4. WMI query language – Data Queries: Associators Of 5. WMI query language – Data Queries: References Of 6. WMI query language – Event Queries: Introduction 7. WMI query language – Event Queries: Syntax 8. WMI query language – Event Queries: …

eBook Update: Layman’s guide to PowerShell 2.0 remoting

After lot of procrastination, I finally completed updates to my PowerShell remoting eBook. First of all, many thanks to Jan Egil Ring (@JanEgilRing) for contributing Appendix B: Remoting in an enterprise. This is a great addition to the content of this eBook. These are the changes that went in to this update. Chapter 2 Enable remoting for only a specific network adapter Remoting in an Enterprise Chapter 3 Run script files on remote computers Chapter 9 Added a note on Domain controller credential delegation Updated a note on Windows XP/2003 support for CredSSP Appendix A Added some more FAQ Appendix B Remoting in an Enterprise by Jan Egil Ring I’ve replaced the old download link with the updates and here is the download link. You can download the older version of this eBook here. Looking forward to your feedback, as always.

eBook: Layman’s guide to PowerShell 2.0 remoting

If are you a regular visitor to this blog, you may be aware of my PowerShell remoting series of blog articles. Traffic to this blog increased by almost 80% ever since I started the remoting series. This set of articles appear on the first page of Internet search almost all the time. The idea behind starting the remoting series was to develop the content in to an eBook at the end. I have been sitting on it for while and just got a chance to complete it after a few late night efforts.This eBook has more content than the remoting blog posts. This kinda concludes the remoting series. There are a few things I have not discussed including fan-in remoting. I will add those things as separate chapters, if required. You can download the eBook here This eBook got an update from the initial release. Here are the additions in the update. Chapter 2 Enable remoting for only a specific network adapter Remoting in an Enterprise Chapter 3 Run script files on remote computers Chapter 9 …

eBook: Windows Server Virtualization – Virtual Storage

In this release — Chapter 4: Virtual Storage — I wrote quite a bit on what all is supported under Hyper-V and talked about some best practices when using various types of virtual storage. This chapter focuses on how to create and manage virtual storage using various methods available. These methods include Hyper-V MMC, Diskpart.exe, Diskmgmt.msc and Hyper-V WMI interfaces. I have tested all the scripts on a Windows Server 2008 R2 system with Hyper-V role.

Future of OS virtualization

In this post I will write about my thoughts on how I wish or perceive the OS virtualization technology to be in future. Over here, I will talk about how the hypervisor layer might look like in the future and as a result, how a few more things around the hypervisor will change. I will also talk about a few benefits of this new evolution.  All the information in this post is looking at the future and probably how I envision this technology. There may be companies or people already working along the same lines. I DO NOT have knowledge of any such “confidential” information. If I were, I will not discuss that here.  The Hypervisor If you look at the evolution of virtualization there were multiple phases in it. It all started with mainframes and moved on to hosted virtualization or type-2 hypervisor products like Virtual PC, etc. Next biggest leap in this technology area was the development of type-1 hypervisors or bare metal hypervisors such as Microsoft Hyper-v or VMWare ESX. Today, we …