All posts filed under: Virtual PC

Windows 7 – WinXP Mode; Final thoughts

I thought of writing another post on how to install your own VM but then there is a guide from MS about all that. I don’t want to repeat the same stuff here. However, I am working on a few issues I have identified with XPM on my home computer. I will write about those issues and hopefully a solution to those issue later. This is probably the first time I did multiple posts on the same topic. Being a virtualization enthusiast, I naturally got interested in Windows Virtual PC feature and picked up only this feature after I installed Windows 7 RC. I feel it is a nice attempt by Microsoft to eliminate the application compatibility woes everyone had with Vista. Using virtualization to solve the problem is really impressive. For the home and small business customers this really makes sense. Of course, one must try and upgrade the app itself when needed. XPM is a good alternative until you upgrade your apps to work on new OS. XPM is certainly a nice feature but there is nothing great about it. …

Host or Windows 7 drives mapped as network drives within Virtual Windows XP

Windows 7 – WinXP Mode; part 3

I will provide bit more information on what I have found so far about WinXP mode or Virual Windows XP. Like I mentioned in my earlier post, when you choose to install Windows Virtual PC and Virtual Windows XP, you basically get a preconfigured version of Windows XP with integration components that enable access to host file system, USB, Network and of course, give host access to applications installed within the VM.  As you see in the above image, all drives on my host or Windows 7 system are mapped as network drives in the VM. Now, at the command prompt, if you run Net use command, it reveals that they are infact mapped to the host. if you have noticed, network drive mapping is pointing to TSCLIENT. Now, what is TSCLIENT? I don’t know the answer yet. That is certainly not my Windows 7 computer name. I will come to this topic in a later post. One point worth noting is, you can have only one connection to virtual Windows XP. This means, you …

Windows 7 – WinXP mode; part 2

Okay…I did some digging since I installed Windows Virtual PC to see what exactly happens when you get this feature up and running. Like we all know by now, this feature — or set of patches you download — installs a Windows XP virtual machine with some pre-configured settings. This virtual machine is configured to use 256MB of memory, NIC Shared Networking, etc. After the install, you get an option to launch the VM and on my machine, it took some sweet 15mins to complete “setting up for first use..” phase. BTW, there was one moment when the memory usage was 90%…!! Inside the Windows XP virtual machine or Virtual Windows XP — as it is referred, you can find that the Remote Desktop Connection is enabled. By deafult, none of the applications are published for remote access. Now, for example, you want to access Internet Explorer 6 on the host i.e. your Windows 7 desktop, all you need to do is, Inside the Windows XP virtual machine – Right click on the start button – Click on Open …

Windows 7: WinXP mode

Over the weekend, I downloded and installed Windows 7 RC on my home PC. The download was pathetically slow but the install just took ~10mins. I am not really a client OS guy and so, was not very keen on “on the surface” features such as Aero *, etc. They are good features from an end user perspective but not my cup of tea. There is one new addition in RC, Windows Virtual PC which enables WinXP mode of application compatibility. This feature is not native to OS. You need to download a seperate package. You can read more about it here. You don’t have to wait until 5th May — if you have MSDN / TechNet subscription — to get a copy of this feature. This download included a MSU file and a MSI file which contains Windows XP virtual machine. Quite easy to Get started. You can refer to the Virtual PC Guide Here. This feature requires hardware assisted virtualization and hence your processor must have support for Intel-VT or AMD-V. Of course, …

Kernel debug of a Guest from host using WinDBG – Hyper V

It is like the same old method used in Virtual Server or Virtual PC. This post will use some screenshots to explain the same thing for Hyper-V. In genera, for debugging guest OS, we use named pipes. You can read more about named pipes here. To configure the VM for kernel debugging Turn-off the guest Open Hyper-V manager Right Click on Virtual Machine and select “Settings” In the Settings window, select COM1 on the left side of the window On the right side, Select Named Pipe and type “VirtualCom1″ as the name or anything you like as the pipe name Click OK to exit the VM settings window Now, on the Host system, install Windows Debugging Tools. You can download the tools from here. After the install is complete, Open WinDBG window and connect to the named pipe by clicking on File -> Kernel Debug option Select Pipe and Reconnect check boxes Type in the named pipe name in the Port text box. For example, if the pipe name is VirtualCom1 as shown in the …